When To Expect Perfection

I have a confession to make: I’m a season behind on Orange is the New Black. Not as in I haven’t had a chance to sit down and binge watch season 4 yet, I mean it was a spoiler to me that Poussey and Soso are a couple.

Now I’m not upset by the spoilers. In fact like with most shows I tend to use spoilers to find out whether or not to continue to spend time on a series and while perusing Tumblr I found some folks talking about Daya’s character.

The gist of the spoiler is that Daya has some very nasty say about Afrolatinxs, which upset a lot of people since the actress Dascha Polanco identifies as Afrolatina.

Now ever since season one I’ve been confused by how the Latinas have been characterized on the show. To be honest, I’ve been confused about how almost all of the women of color on the show are characterized. The show seemed to take an inordinate amount of time to even acknowledge Blackness in some of them and when it did, the references seemed half-assed. In season two, they talk about how slaves in the Caribbean hid their magic in Catholicism as if it were an answer on TriviaCrack. So I’m not exactly shocked that the show may or may not portray race among Latinxs well.

I expressed my concern, hoping some folks would let me know if it was worth continuing the show or if I should let my memory of the show stay preserved in season two. I got a response from someone who posed a question: If we expected Women of Color to be perfect in every representation, would we have no Women of Color in media?

I know, this seems facetious, but it’s a valid question. There are plenty of things that I’ve passed on because of how terrible their representation of Black women was. And while there are plenty of shows that I watch that are problematic, just because I can enjoy them doesn’t mean they’re above critique.

So while I’m not sure yet if I’m going to keep watching OITNB I do hope that even if I don’t the show keeps being critiqued, because that’s how the representation gets better.

Gone For A Minute Now I’m Back

This might be the 5th time I’ve dusted off this site and decided to write again. I want to blame business for it, but honestly my desire to participate in the overall Black nerd debates has waned a bit. That along with my already short attention span has made keeping up with blogging hard.

However I’m back (again) on the scene and for the most part still have some pretty strong feels about being Black, femme and nerdy in a world that likes to deny my existence.

I also have some wonderful news.

While it may be hard to tell based on the frequency of which I update here, I love to write. It hasn’t been until recently that I’ve had the courage to submit anything anywhere but last year at the behest of both the Nerdgasm girls and Inda Lauryn of Black Girl Squee, I submitted a short story to Crossed Genres for the Hidden Youth anthology. I honestly wasn’t expecting more than a polite rejection letter. Instead my story was accepted.

For those of you who might not know, Hidden Youth is the second Hidden anthology book from Crossed Genres. The first is Long Hidden which was released in 2014. The theme of the anthology is stories told from The Margins of History, meaning stories from the point of view of marginalized people of a certain era. Hidden Youth added an extra criteria, requiring the stories to have marginalized main characters under the age of 18.

Right now they have a Kickstarter active to raise money for the production of the book. The incentives for backers are not only ebook and/or print copies of Hidden Youth, but also ebook and/or print copies of Long Hidden as well. If you want to know just how good Long Hidden is make sure you check out Nerdgasm Noire’s review of the book.